Foster a Cat

Foster an animal in need

CAAA does not have a shelter where we can house animals. Instead we rely on fostering.

Would you like to foster cats or kittens for CAAA? We need you!

If you can help please contact Sura on 072 068 0884 or email here

Help Needed

Currently care is being provided for approximately 320 stray and abandoned animals in the Cape Town area including Brooklyn, Paarden Eiland, Willowbridge, Durbanville, Cape Gate, Cape Town International Airport, Epping and near Fisantekraal. Most of the animals are cats but we also provide help for dogs. Our work includes trapping, testing for feline AIDS and feline leukemia, neutering, and then returning and providing a feeding program.

Pensioners also receive help with feeding and care for their animals in these areas, where possible.

To see how you can help please see our Wish List by clicking here.

Domestic Animals – Interesting facts

dogs and cats

Below are some excellent resources on cats and dogs for download , especially for teachers, but also of great use to adults with children who are thinking of adopting a domestic companion

The cat (PDF, 1.01MB) - an information resource for youngsters, including worksheets.

The dog (PDF,5.44MB) -everything you need to know about canine companions, and more!

THE DOG

The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domesticated subspecies of the gray wolf. The domestic dog has been one of the most widely kept working and companion animals in human history. There are estimated to be 400 million dogs in the world.

The dog has developed into hundreds of varied breeds. Height measured to the withers ranges from a few inches in the Chihuahua to a few feet in the Irish Wolfhound; color varies from white through grays (usually called blue) to black, and browns from light (tan) to dark ("red" or "chocolate") in a wide variation of patterns; coats can be very short to many centimeters long, from coarse hair to something akin to wool, straight or curly, or smooth.

Domestic dogs come in many shapes and sizes because they have been selectively bred for millennia for various behaviors, sensory capabilities, and physical attributes. Modern dog breeds show more variation in size, appearance, and behavior than any other domestic animal. Within the range of extremes, dogs generally share attributes with their wild ancestors, the wolves. Dogs are predators and scavengers, possessing sharp teeth and strong jaws for attacking, holding, and tearing their food. Although selective breeding has changed the appearance of many breeds, all dogs retain basic traits from their distant ancestors. Like many other predatory mammals, the dog has powerful muscles, fused wristbones, a cardiovascular system that supports both sprinting and endurance, and teeth for catching and tearing.

The dog's visual system is engineered to serve the purposes of a hunter. Although difficult to measure, the visual acuity of poodles have been estimated to translate to a Snellen rating of 20/75. Visual discrimination, however, is greatly increased for moving objects. Dogs have been shown to be able to discriminate between humans (i.e., identifying their human) from distances up to a mile.

Dogs are susceptible to various diseases, ailments, and poisons, some of which affect humans in the same way, others of which are unique to dogs. Dogs, like all mammals, are also susceptible to heat exhaustion when dealing with high levels of humidity and/or extreme temperatures.

Two serious medical conditions affecting dogs are pyometra, affecting unspayed females of all types and ages, and bloat, which affects the larger breeds or deep chested dogs. Both of these are acute conditions, and can kill rapidly; owners of dogs which may be at risk should learn about such conditions as part of good animal care.

Common external parasites are various species of fleas, ticks, and mites. Internal parasites include hookworms, tapeworms, roundworms, and heartworms.

Despite descending from wolves, the domestic dog is classified as an omnivore. The classification in the Order Carnivora does not necessarily mean that a dog's diet must be restricted to meat; unlike an obligate carnivore, such as the cat family with its shorter small intestine, a dog is neither dependent on meat-specific protein nor a very high level of protein in order to fulfill its basic dietary requirements. Dogs are able to healthily digest a variety of foods including vegetables and grains, and in fact dogs can consume a large proportion of these in their diet. In the wild, canines often eat available plants and fruits.

Dangerous substances

Some foods commonly enjoyed by humans are dangerous to dogs, including chocolate (Theobromine poisoning), onions, grapes and raisins, some types of gum, certain sweeteners, and Macadamia nuts.

· Chocolate can contain high amounts of fat and caffeine-like stimulants known as methylxanthines which, ingested in significant amounts, can potentially produce clinical effects in dogs ranging from vomiting and diarrhea to panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures, and even death in severe cases. Typically, the darker the chocolate, the higher the potential for clinical problems. White chocolate may not have the same potential as darker forms to cause a methylxanthine poisoning, but the high fat content of lighter chocolates could still lead to vomiting and diarrhea, as well as the possible development of life-threatening pancreatitis, an inflammatory condition of the pancreas.

· The acute danger from grapes and raisins was discovered around 2000, and has slowly been publicized since then. The cause is not known. Small quantities will induce acute renal failure. Sultanas and currants may also be dangerous. · Xylitol, a sugar substitute found in a variety of sugar-free and dietetic cookies, mints, and chewing gum is proving highly toxic, even fatal, to dogs.

· A toxic dose of roasted macadamia nuts may be as little as one nut per kilogram of body weight in the dog.

· Alcoholic beverages pose comparable hazards to dogs as they do to humans, but due to low body weight and lack of alcohol tolerance they are toxic in much smaller portions. Signs of alcohol intoxication in pets may include vomiting, wobbly gait, depression, disorientation, and/or hypothermia (low core body temperature). High doses may result in heart arrhythmias, seizures, tremors, and even death.


Dogs have traditionally been used for a variety of tasks since their domestication by early man. Dogs have been bred for herding livestock, different kinds of hunting (e.g., pointers, hounds) keeping living spaces clear of rats, guarding, helping fishermen with nets, and pulling loads in addition to their roles as companions.

More recently, many dogs have taken on a number of roles under the general classification of service dogs. Service dogs provide assistance to individuals with disabilities (either physical or mental. These roles include guide dogs, utility dogs, assistance dogs, hearing dogs and psychological therapy dogs. Some dogs have even been shown to alert their handler when the handler shows signs of an impending seizure. Some can achieve this well in advance of the onset of the seizure, allowing the owner to seek safety, medication or medical care.


THE CAT

The cat (Felis catus), also known as the domestic cat or house cat to distinguish it from other felines, is a small predatorycarnivorousspecies of crepuscularmammal that is valued by humans for its companionship and its ability to hunt vermin, snakes and scorpions. They have been associated with humans for at least 9,500 years.

A skilled predator, the cat is known to hunt over 1,000 species for food. It can be trained to obey simple commands. Individual cats have also been known to learn on their own to manipulate simple mechanisms, such as doorknobs. Cats use a variety of vocalizations and types of body language for communication, including meowing, purring, hissing, growling, squeaking, chirping, clicking and grunting.

Cats may be the most popular animal companions in the world, with over 600 million in homes all over the world.

Until recently the cat was commonly believed to have been domesticated in ancient Egypt, where it was a cult animal. However a 2007 study found that the lines of descent of all house cats probably run through as few as five self-domesticatingAfrican Wildcats.

Cats possess rather loose skin; this allows them to turn and confront a predator or another cat in a fight, even when it has a grip on them. This is also an advantage for veterinary purposes, as it simplifies injections. In fact, the lives of cats with kidney failure can sometimes be extended for years by the regular injection of large volumes of fluid subcutaneously, which serves as an alternative to dialysis.

The particularly loose skin at the back of the neck is known as the scruff, and is the area by which a mother cat grips her kittens to carry them. As a result, cats tend to become quiet and passive when gripped there. This behavior also extends into adulthood, when a male will grab the female by the scruff to immobilize her while he mounts, and to prevent her from running away as the mating process takes place.

This technique can be useful when attempting to treat or move an uncooperative cat. However, since an adult cat is heavier than a kitten, a companion cat should never be carried by the scruff, but should instead have its weight supported at the rump and hind legs, and at the chest and front paws. Often (much like a small child) a cat will lie with its head and front paws over a person's shoulder, and its back legs and rump supported under the person's arm.

Cats conserve energy by sleeping more than most animals, especially as they grow older. The daily duration of sleep varies, usually 12–16 hours, with 13–14 being the average. Some cats can sleep as much as 20 hours in a 24-hour period.

Cats are classified as obligatecarnivores, because their physiology is geared toward efficient processing of meat, and lacks efficient processes for digesting plant matter. The cat cannot produce its own taurine (an essential organic acid) in its own body and as it is contained in flesh, the cat must eat flesh to survive. Similarly as with its teeth, a cat's digestive tract has become specialized over time to suit meat eating, having shortened in length only to those segments of intestine best able to break down proteins and fats from animal flesh. This trait severely limits the cat's ability to properly digest, metabolize, and absorb plant-derived nutrients, as well as certain fatty acids, although properly researched and nutritionally sound vegan options are available overseas. For example, taurine is scarce in plants but abundant in meats. It is a key amino sulfonic acid for eye health in cats. Taurine deficiency can cause a condition called macular degeneration wherein the cat's retina slowly degenerates, eventually causing irreversible blindness.

Despite the cat's meat-oriented physiology, it is still quite common for a cat to supplement its carnivorous diet with small amounts of grass, leaves, shrubs, houseplants, or other plant matter.

The liver of a cat is less effective at detoxification than those of other animals, including humans and dogs; therefore exposure to many common substances considered safe for households may be extremely dangerous, if not fatal to them.

cat.jpg

The cat above is one of the unfortunates who had been awfully abused, and has been cared for by the volunteers of Capetonians Against Animal Abuse for many years.

Banking Details

Capetonians Against
Animal Abuse

Bank: Standard Bank
Branch: Bayside Branch
Branch No: 022209
Account Type: Cheque
Account No: 271 233 974

To make direct payments for our vet bills please use banking details below.

Durbanville Animal Hospital
Bank: Nedbank
Branch No: 103 710
Account Type: Current
Account No: 103 703 1555
Reference: 16546 + your name

Please remember to send us notice of your payment.